Raffaello's garlic growing brother

Raffaello's garlic growing brother

Jitters for garlic

If anyone had told me 10 years ago that I might one day get as excited about garlic as about chocolate, I would have - well - eaten a garlic bulb whole!  My garlic-in-London experience had mostly, up to then, been supermarket staple white nylon [...]

Sugared Almond Frenzy in Tuscany

Sugared  Almond Frenzy in Tuscany

A not so sweet comment on a contemporary culinary twist in Tuscany

It is a rare thing for me to speak badly of anything in the culinary line in Tuscany, but in the past month, I have been presented with enough little toile packets of sugared almonds of varying quality, pink ones, white ones, lurid green 'pistacchio'[...]

Happy 122 Years to our Tuscan Madre

Happy 122 Years to our Tuscan Madre

Give or take a few days, our much loved mother is 122 years old.  We have only had her for 22 years but we always celebrate her birthday.I'm talking 'lievito madre' (literally 'raising mother' in Italian), sourdough starter in English.This aside[...]

Waking to Nightingales in Tuscany

Waking to Nightingales in Tuscany

Despairing of the encroaching weeds that seemed to have sprung up overnight on a diet of alternating sun and rain, fretting at the chances of being able to get the garden in order before the Tuscan sun heats up and all in all feeling a little grouchy[...]

Bless this house

Bless this house

I was in the middle of trussing a joint yesterday when the dogs started barking their 'someone we don't know and who is wearing something very odd, is in the garden', woof. Not what you really want in that particular moment, but the dogs were pretty [...]

Mimosa

Mimosa

March 8 women's day

 Responding to a rap at the window, I had opened the door to find the entire frame filled with yellow.  The vision moved and a head popped out above the yellow fuzz. I wasn't familiar with mimosa flowers at the time, having only recently mo[...]

My Desert Island Vegetable

My Desert Island Vegetable

Carciofi - Archichokes

If I was stranded on a desert island with the possibility of choosing only one vegetable, I would not hesitate for a moment to ask for carciofi.  My fascination with this vegetable since living in Tuscany, has never, never abated.  I love e[...]

Not always under the Tuscan sun

Not always under the Tuscan sun

cooking up sunshine

Contrary to popular belief, we're not always 'under the Tuscan sun' in Tuscany.  Right now I'm glued to the cosy warmth of the aga - along with the cat and our two maltese terriers.  My excuse for not joining my husband in the grey 'no-ness[...]

Not every doughnut comes out with a hole

Not every doughnut comes out with a hole

Old Tuscan saying

It never fails to tickle my fancy, during these winter months, to see the familiar signs being pasted to the glass doors of bars (Italian bars - ergo - coffee shops).  The ones with their own pastry making facilities.  Sometimes hand writte[...]

Thank you

Thank you

Old-Fashioned Magic and New Year Beginnings

I’m writing this perched on the old wooden sledge under our nostalgically fragrant Christmas tree. A nice place to be with the log fire roaring and Cosimo and Pucci keeping my feet cosy, to reflect on the year that is coming to a close. The bridge [...]

Zia Anna

Zia Anna

Delightful December Absurdities

I could have googled,  but Zia Anna in nearby Florence was a much more personable option.  Having just cracked 30 of my neighbour’s hens eggs and mixed them with a kilogramme of parmesan, I was seized with one of those moments when the im[...]

For the past 20 years Elizabeth has been cooking and eating her way around the kitchens of Tuscany’s mamma’s and nonna’s, gleaning the secrets of this mythical culinary heritage.

Since packing up her London life, her Tuscan food quest has led her on all sorts of unexpected adventures. Most recently, and in the face of tough competition from Tuscan born chefs, Elizabeth was invited to Toronto Canada to represent Tuscan cuisine and hold a master class with effervescent young international chefs.

To complete her ‘Tuscan Dream’, her Florentine husband whom she met in the skies between Florence and London, shares this passion. Growing up in a Florentine family with three women dedicated full-time to the preparation of family meals, sowed the seeds of his extensive culinary heritage. Together they have cooked, hiked, biked and roamed, up and down the hills and valleys of Tuscany in search of pastures and plots of off-the-beaten-track artisan growers and producers at the heart of the Tuscan table.

Several years ago Elizabeth and Marco gave in to the call of this hobby central to their Tuscan country lifestyle, putting aside their separate professions to open a small restaurant in the garden of their 15th century watermill home in Tuscany near Florence, which in the meantime they had found, bought and restored, where they give free reign to what they call their ‘lifestyle cooking’. Here they share their experiences with other food and wine enthusiasts. Doggedly going against the flow of growth, expansion and profit in response to success and awards, they stick fast to their philosophy of a totally home-made traditional Tuscan menu, favouring local growers and producers of fresh, seasonal and traditional food and ingredients. Dining in the restaurant on a 35km menu is a culinary romp around the places of the people who produce.

Participating in their Tuscan cooking classes is equivalent to dipping into their lifestyle.

Their Tuscan Cooking Classes began initially with the encouragement of the local ladies who started Elizabeth on this adventure, followed later by the request of Italians who came to eat in their ‘lifestyle restaurant’. Discovering the joys of cooking with like-minded enthusiasts from all walks of life and all corners of the globe, opened the doors to a whole new exciting chapter.

People are attracted who love to cook and to eat, who love Tuscany, its incredible natural produce, its wines, the countryside, the art, architecture and history of this cradle of culture; people who love to cook and eat all day, to talk about food and culinary traditions, often with a glass of Chianti in one hand and a spatula in the other while Marco chats about the origins of traditional dishes and the art and history of Florence; people who want to prepare as many dishes as possible; others who prefer to cook and eat all day, then climb into the jeep to drive into the hills to visit a cheese maker, hunt for truffles, or sample the region’s famed wines and olive oil, then come home, cook some more, take a dip in the pool, feast, relax infront of the log fire with a glass of wine and a coffee; people who want to do all of this in a home where history, tradition, art, food, wine and beauty are a natural part of the owner’s lifestyle.

The house motto says it all, ‘Cucinare è Voler Bene’ – ‘To Cook is To Love’.

‘Casa Ceri’ refers to Marco’s Florentine family history which dates back to 15th century Florence.

The logo is inspired by the Casa Ceri coat of arms

logo casa ceri

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